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Published: Mon, November 28, 2016
USA | By Yvette Dunn

Trump aide mocks election challenge


There have been cases before of electors breaking from their state's popular vote tallies before - so-called "faithless electors" - but they have been scattered and unorganized.

Calls for Electoral College to choose Clinton over Trump are gaining momentum, even as the president-elect continues with cabinet hopefuls for his administration. Despite the surging popular votes of Clinton against Trump, the result is not likely to change.

In 2000, Democrat Al Gore's final lead over George W Bush, who won the election after a prolonged legal challenge, was almost 544,000.

His stance on Clinton, the former secretary of state, was a jarring pivot from the presidential campaign, during which he called her "Crooked Hillary" and threatened during one of their debates to put his Democratic opponent in jail.

If they can succeed in denying Trump the 270 electoral votes needed to win, the decision would then go to the House of Representatives, where delegations of representatives from each state would decide whom to support.

It has also caused many to question the Electoral College and Democratic strategies for winning presidential elections.

Trump said in an interview with the New York Times on Tuesday that he would "rather do the popular vote" and was "never a fan of the Electoral College".

Game Preview: Ohio State at Michigan State
You can still get your team right for MI and administer an azz whipping, and that's what I expect Saturday in East Lansing. The end result is a win, although the Buckeyes aren't in a position where simply winning is guaranteed to be good enough.

Clinton is the fifth presidential nominee to win the popular vote but lose the electoral vote in the USA history.

One of Trump's core campaign promises was his pledge to "repeal and replace" Obamacare, which he repeatedly dubbed a "disaster" during the campaign. They should exercise that choice by leaving the election as the people decided it: in Clinton's favor.

The former secretary of state would need to win MI and overturn the results in Wisconsin and Pennsylvania to win the electoral college. She lost Wisconsin by 27,000 votes.

Green Party presidential nominee Jill Stein and others are seeking an audit and recount of the results in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin. "The margin is about 12,000 in MI, 27,000 in Wisconsin, 68,000 in Pennsylvania and 113,000 in Florida - close, but nothing compared to the 537 votes that separated George W. Bush and Al Gore in Florida 16 years ago", said Wolf. A handful abstained from voting altogether.

In fact, Lawrence Lessig, a professor at Harvard Law School, argued in a recent Washington Post column that if the Electoral College did not overturn the result by electing Hillary Clinton to the White House on December 19, such a move will be unconstitutional.

Moreover, there have been attempts to link charges of election manipulation to the Russia-baiting by the Clinton campaign and the Democratic Party during the months before the election, when the Democrats claimed that the Russian government was responsible for hacking into the emails of campaign chairman Podesta and the Democratic National Committee. Some activists and academics that formed a coalition are calling on US authorities to fully audit or recount the election results, particularly in Michigan, Pennsylvania and Wisconsin.

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