Published: Thu, June 15, 2017
World | By Tasha Manning

Uncategorized Archives - El Nido

Uncategorized Archives - El Nido

When Other Mother's Attack

In nursing, we have a saying: "eating our young." This means older, experienced nurses are just mean or overly critical of the new generation of nurses. This is, luckily starting to go out of style, but still exists. I am sure it exists in many different professions, not only nursing. It also exists in mothers. New mothers (or any woman walking around with a baby or a pregnant belly) are suddenly fair game for all sorts of unsolicited advice, criticism, and apparently uninvited touching.

This happens to us all, but it happened Today in a way that really surprised me. First, my youngest baby is just barely 2 months old, second, he is a screamer. So when he falls asleep, it is a blessing. Today, I was walking in a store with my little one sleeping in my left arm. He was finally asleep and in his favorite position. He was kind of upright, with his head tilted back against my forearm. A woman rushed up to us (common right) I thought to see her cute lil face. Here is the key - she lifted her head. She is the key to the life of a woman. She not only touched him, she physically moved him. I was livid. With 4 other kids under 7 with me, I had a good excuse to walk away quickly but it took all my self-control to hold my tongue. I said, "No!" And walked away quickly. I know that many women have the same issue, but I question the root of the problem. What makes people believe that new mothers or pregnant women need to be "taught" things. I am interested in seeing some opinions here.

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Instead of criticizing, we really should applaud each other, encourage each other, and support each other for all the different decisions we are able to make. Breast, bottle, vaccines, no vaccines, organic, not organic, we are mostly doing the best we can and no one is perfect anyone, so why all the fighting? We are women. We can discuss our differences and disagree with each other and then hug and laugh about things we have in common.

What do you do in situations like this? Does anyone find random, unsolicited advise helpful? What about when strangers touch your belly or your children without asking?

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