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Published: Tue, September 19, 2017
World | By Tasha Manning

Stories-from-the-Road


This program is multifaceted with focuses on teaching, providing services, facilitating new programs, and improving animal welfare.

Elvira (Guanajuato Mexico)

We have a good day in the country, way past the paved roads and the traffic; Way past the bright lights and boutiques of San Miguel de Allende. After, some wrong turns, over rough roads, we finally used to "Mexican GPS" (gave a ride to a local woman) and found our destination, the little town of Elvira. The rocky hillside pasture where we worked in the determined sun, had only a little shade and a small patch of level ground, which was a "stimulating" hike down from the limited space we had for parking. The gates and alleys on the way were clearly made for foot (human, horse, and donkey) and not motorized vehicles.

Without any apparent signal or advertisement, the horses, mules, and burros started arriving. You could see their little dust trails in the distance. Families on horseback, the adolescent boys spinning their ropes in the Charro style, horses, yearlings, foals, mules, and asses all moving together, under saddle, lead, or free, began to spread across the lot. Animals were tied to mesquite trees, cactus, and little stubs of bushes that had been cut down. All were on long lengths of rope, but there was no tangling or disturbance. They had been tethered in this way many times before.

Of course, teeth were floated, surgeries and anesthesias completed safely, and the first tetanus vaccinations of these animals were administered. However, sometimes it is taught what is most important.

The volunteer veterinarians and students are doing excellent work, to the extent that I get a chance to kind of stand back, be available to help, and, for a change, reflect. When the family who owned the little compound where we were working brought out the lunch of tortillas, nopales, beans, and chicken in a chili sauce. I thanked our hosts, took my plate, and some water and went to sit on an ancient stone fence. As I looked out across the broad expanse of fields, mesquite, cactus, and stones in the dust pastels of Mexico, I could not help but think that some pay a lot of money to see such beauty, eat such exotic food, and feel the Heart beat of a different culture and world. This is, of course, in addition to the benefits of the excellent sun tan, Spanish lessons, and physical work out that these days provide. We get to do this, and make the hard lives of the generous and kind animals and people of this land, just maybe a little bit better. We do not want to be anywhere else ...

Powaqqatsi - Philip Glass
His music can speak directly with the soul in an utterance of repetition that is always changing. He has created a musical language that is at eleven complex, possessed of pure simplicity.

Rosie, Guanajuato Mexico 2013

Rosie, Guanajuato Mexico

Then there was Rosie: Found in a broken-down corral where livestock dealer kept cattle and goats, she had apparently arrived With a group of cattle, in miserable condition, and had an old fracture of her radius. We could not leave her there, we just bought her for the equivalent of $ 17.00, a loaded burro is worth about $ 30.00, and she took her place where she could get care and rehabilitation, and an adoptive home. You can see the fracture: right about where a small pickup truck would hit the donkey's forearm. Burros are often injured this way as they graze on the unfenced shoulders of the roadways and people do not slow down. The fracture had healed, after a fashion, and this really gentle animal (there ARE no bad asses ...) was getting around pretty well. However, because she had limited access to food, she had been eating a lot of garbage. (Sorry for those of you who are less veterinary oriented: I just HAD to include these pictures of plastic bags in donkey poop .... Alikely to new "first" for Facebook.) She also had a nasty bleeding sarcoid In warmer climes). All in all: some analgesics, some antiparasitics, a corrective hoof trim, and cryosurgery on the sarcoid and "Rosie" (her new name ... no idea why) is enjoying life and looking for a future either in San Miguel or the USA Anybody know a good 'coyote'? Dogs are a lot easier to bring back to the states ...) and

Guanajuato Mexico 2014

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