Published: Thu, November 23, 2017
World | By Tasha Manning

Crested Oropendola | San Vito Bird Club

Crested Oropendola | San Vito Bird Club

Oropendola nests.

Photo by Monique Girard.

If you drive from San Vito toward Sabalito, the pendants can not be seen across the air strip about one-third of the way down the runway. They are hanging on the left side of a tree with the common name 'Poro' that attracts orioles, warblers, bananaquits, hummingbirds and more when it flowers.

LEAF OF LIFE by Angie Vergara on Prezi
ANGIE VERGARA VIDES Date of Birth: August 1, 1994 Cell Phone: 3146326355 Address: Cra 78f N ° 0-33 City: Bogota Marital Status: Single Email: angievergara1@gmail.com PROFESSIONAL PROFILE Focused To the work of projects with capacity to work in team and to achieve to propose and to listen to learn more.

We need to stake out to be sure The birds are Crested Oropendolas! This species was first recorded here in 1999 having expanded its range from nearby Panama. Historically, San Vito had a population of Chestnut-headed Oropendola but the newcomers routed them and are now only found in the Southern Pacific region.

Our excellent viewer Wendy Bernstein has reported us a new colony Which has been established on the San Vito airstrip.

Travel from San Vito to Sabalito the hanging nests can be observed to the other side of the track approximately to a third of the track. The nests are hanging on the left side of a tree commonly known as "Poro" which also attracts orioles, reinits and bananaquits, hummingbirds and many more when it is in flowering season.

We need to check that these nests correspond To Crested Oropendolas, a species that was first counted in 1999, having expanded its distribution range of the contiguous country Panama. Historically, San Vito had a population of Chestnut-headed Oropendolas but the newcomers have displaced them and today they are the only species found in the South Pacific.

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